Your browser's Javascript functionality is turned off. Please turn it on so that you can experience the full capabilities of this site.

Types of Tea: What's in a Brew?

Black, Oolong, White, Green... with so much tea in the world, how do you know which brew's right for you? We explain the ins, outs, ups and downs of each tea type.

Shop This Tea

The ultimate Australian breakfast featuring
T2 Aussie Breakfast Loose Leaf Tea 100g

There are hundreds of different teas, but every single one comes from the same plant: Camellia Sinensis. Nature's good like that.

In general, some types of tea have a bit of bite, while others are smoother on your palate. Some pack a bit of kick with caffeine, while others are a quieter affair.

There are those who like it hot, and some who prefer a splash of cold to bring out their best.

Selecting the right tea to suit your mood is all about knowing which leaf does what, and what state of mind you want to be in. Ready? Let's get this show on the road…

White tea.

One of the most revered of all teas, white tea is the least processed and the closest tea comes to its natural state. You might have even tried the two varieties: Pai Mu Tan and Silver Needles. Delivering a yellow brew that's smooth, sweet and refreshingly elegant, this tea type needs no guest appearances - so milk and sugar can take a back seat. And with minimal caffeine, you can sip away all day.

Green tea.

As the world's first processed tea, green tea is either steamed or pan fried. This is a little unlike black tea, which is fermented or fully oxidised. Ideal without milk, and best to drink on a full tummy – this brew's low on caffeine but will still perk you up, no problemo.

Black tea.

Mention the word 'tea' and this is what most people think of. Arguably the world's most popular drink, black tea has its origins in China, where it's known as 'red tea'. Today, black tea is mostly cultivated in the former British and Dutch colonies of India, Sri Lanka, Africa and Indonesia. With a touch of milk or sugar, black tea brews can shine bright!

Green tea.

As the world's first processed tea, green tea is either steamed or pan fried. This is a little unlike black tea, which is fermented or fully oxidised. Ideal without milk, and best to drink on a full tummy – this brew's low on caffeine but will still perk you up, no problemo.

Black tea.

Mention the word 'tea' and this is what most people think of. Arguably the world's most popular drink, black tea has its origins in China, where it's known as 'red tea'. Today, black tea is mostly cultivated in the former British and Dutch colonies of India, Sri Lanka, Africa and Indonesia. With a touch of milk or sugar, black tea brews can shine bright!

Oolong tea.

One of the world's most famous Chinese teas, oolong means 'black dragon'. This semi-fermented tea means that it's a little like black tea and a little like green tea. In China it's known as 'blue tea'. Oolong leaves are processed directly after picking; undergoing sun drying, partial oxidation and firing in a hot wok.

Herbal & fruit tisanes.

Tisane is the French word for herbal infusion. Enlivening, invigorating, calming or soothing, from the simplicity of a single leaf infusion to the complexities of many blends, each tisane is designed to inspire the body and mind! Meet your perfect caffeine-free fix.

Rooibos & honeybush.

Hailing from South Africa, these earthy brews are two of a kind. Rooibos is Afrikaans for 'red bush' and is cultivated from a native shrub that produces long, slender leaves, similar to pine needles. Honeybush comes from a closely related native shrub and gets its name from the strong honey fragrance that comes from its yellow flowers. You could say this is the perfect thirst-quenching, caffeine-free drop.

Other stories you might like.

Articles. Green tea tales